Useful links: HTML5 Document Outline, Ugly Code?, RWD

Did you see the post where Steve Faulkner called the HTML5 Document Outline a dangerous fiction? Go read it, especially if you’ve been teaching it.

Ugly Code for Hidden Pictures or playing with canvas, as I like to call it, has some interesting ideas for coding with canvas.

10 Things You Need to Know About Responsive Web Design is an Adobe Dev article. It’s an excellent overview of the topic.

Useful Links: Resolution Resource, iPad Air, Usability

Device Screen Resolutions Ordered by OS is a very useful resource from David Storey.

Bryan Cranston now pushing iPads to Apple addicts. This funny headline gives me the opportunity to make a comment on the new iPad Air. I have a regular iPad and an iPad mini and I much prefer the smaller one simply because of weight. I applaud the arrival of a lighter full-sized iPad.

Designing for Usability: Three Key Principles comes from Measuring Usability, a blog by Jeff Sauro with many helpful articles.

Useful links: Women, @media queries, Responsive, Twitter in Edu

What Women Don’t Want is from Ladybits. Spoiler alert – women don’t want TitStare.

7 Habits of Highly Effective Media Queries is an excellent recap of the UX Summit closing session.

Responsive Design is Not About Screen Sizes Anymore is from Speckyboy.

Using Twitter Effectively in Education is a talk from Alec Couros.

Useful Links: Responsive Recruiting, Yahoo logo, meta fizzy

Why Responsive Web Design Can Transform Higher Ed Recruiting. One of many interesting tidbits in this article: “According to research from Higher Education Consultants Noel-Levitz, 68 percent of college applicants have viewed college websites on mobile devices. And if a college’s website isn’t optimized for mobile, these potential students drop off: 24 percent of students would leave a website after a poor internet experience.”

Here’s a view of the changes that Yahoo! went through in building its new logo. It’s simple, and the exclamation mark is animated. What do you think of it?

I’m feeling just a bit cross-eyed after seeing the meta-fizzy effects created in MetaFizzy Effect with SASS at CSS Tricks. Let’s not all go out and do this, okay?

Useful Links: Clown Car, Screen Choice, Teens Online

Estelle Weyl explains Clown Car Technique: Solving Adaptive Images In Responsive Web Design in this article at Smashing Magazine. This is the full story from the originator of the idea and is worth attention.

Tech Crunch says As TV Falls Apart, Tumblr And Twitter Aim To Pick Up The Pieces. The thing this article does not mention is that we choose which screen to pay attention to based on the quality of what we’re getting from the screen in question. The quality on TV is failing, not the medium of TV itself.

McAfee Digital Deception Study 2013: Exploring the Online Disconnect between Parents & Pre-teens, Teens and Young Adults shows that parents don’t really know what their kids are doing. Teachers and parents should take a look at this study.

Useful Links: Web Developer Toolbar, Pinterest, WCAG levels, Responsive Images

I urge all my students to use Chris Pederick’s Web Developer Toolbar. Recently Cynthia Says, which the toolbar uses for a number of tests, added CAPTCHA. Here’s an article that tells you how to replace Cynthia Says with the WAVE tool in the Web Developer Toolbar. Since WAVE is a far better tool than Cynthia Says, this is a good idea for everyone anyway, even if Cynthia Says hadn’t suddenly rendered itself inaccessible.

Pinterest for Designers has tips for getting started with Pinterest and using it to support your brand. The part of the article I found most interesting was the list of boards to follow for ideas about typography, print design, web design, package design, color, logos, and general inspiration.

Responsive Images – Interim Report from Bruce Lawson lays out the current state of things.

Understanding WCAG Level from Karl Groves can help you come to grips with WCAG priority levels.

 

Useful links: Producing content, Mozilla Webmaker, Accessibility and Responsive,

How to be the King or Queen of Your Own Online Content has tips to help you find ways to keep posting good content over the long haul.

Mozilla Webmaker is offering a free online course in digital literacy.

Several experts from UX Matters take on the question of how accessibility and responsive design do (or don’t) work together.