Tips on Using the Dreamweaver CC Layout Grid

I’ve learned a few things about how the Dreamweaver CC layout grid system works after making about 30 different layouts with it and struggling to figure out its bugs.

One helpful thing is to take a look at the stylesheet that Dreamweaver generates after you’ve told it how many columns you want in the various sizes. This is before you’ve entered any content of your own or added any CSS rules of your own.

Read through it and notice the order of the rules and media queries.


@charset "UTF-8";
/* Simple fluid media
   Note: Fluid media requires that you remove the media's height
  and width attributes from the HTML

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/fluid-images/

*/
img, object, embed, video {
	max-width: 100%;
}

/* IE 6 does not support max-width so default to width 100% */
.ie6 img {
	width:100%;
}

/*
	Dreamweaver Fluid Grid Properties
	----------------------------------
	dw-num-cols-mobile:		4;
	dw-num-cols-tablet:		8;
	dw-num-cols-desktop:	12;
	dw-gutter-percentage:	15;

	Inspiration from "Responsive Web Design" by Ethan Marcotte 

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/responsive-web-design

	and Golden Grid System by Joni Korpi

http://goldengridsystem.com/

*/

.fluid {
	clear: both;
	margin-left: 0;
	width: 100%;
	float: left;
	display: block;
}

.fluidList {
    list-style:none;
    list-style-image:none;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;        
}

/* Mobile Layout: 480px and below. */

.gridContainer {
	margin-left: auto;
	margin-right: auto;
	width: 96.7391%;
	padding-left: 1.6304%;
	padding-right: 1.6304%;
	clear: none;
	float: none;
}
#div1 {
}
.zeroMargin_mobile {
    margin-left: 0;
}
.hide_mobile {
    display: none;
}

/* Tablet Layout: 481px to 768px. Inherits styles
 from: Mobile Layout. */

@media only screen and (min-width: 481px) {

.gridContainer {
	width: 91.4836%;
	padding-left: 0.7581%;
	padding-right: 0.7581%;
	clear: none;
	float: none;
	margin-left: auto;
}
#div1 {
}
.zeroMargin_tablet {
    margin-left: 0;
}
.hide_tablet {
    display: none;
}
}

/* Desktop Layout: 769px to a max of 1232px.  Inherits styles
 from: Mobile Layout and Tablet Layout. */

@media only screen and (min-width: 769px) {

.gridContainer {
	width: 89.0217%;
	max-width: 1232px;
	padding-left: 0.4891%;
	padding-right: 0.4891%;
	margin: auto;
	clear: none;
	float: none;
	margin-left: auto;
}
#div1 {
}
.zeroMargin_desktop {
    margin-left: 0;
}
.hide_desktop {
    display: none;
}
}

The styles all flow from the 480 px and below layout rules. Dreamweaver expects you to begin adapting the style rules and adding your content in the mobile layout. Nothing explains that to you, but when the grid you set up in the File > New dialog opens in the Design View, it opens on the mobile view. Notice the size selector at the bottom of the document window, and the 4 column grid in the background.

This subtle clue means start with the mobile layout. Too subtle?

These subtle clues means start with the mobile layout. Too subtle?

Is opening up in the mobile view too subtle a clue? Shouldn’t there be some text somewhere, about starting with the mobile layout?

Once you have the mobile layout done, you are expected to move to the tablet size layout and adjust the fluid grid accordingly.

Finally, you can make any adjustments to the fluid grid for a desktop layout.

Additionally, when the initial grid layout opens in Design View, it contains a div (with the id div1) which you are expect to delete. There’s nothing to alert you to the fact that you should delete this placeholder div and replace it with a header element or whatever you want to add first to your page.

Since Adobe has so few tutorials that illustrate the proper use of the grid layout system, much of what you need to know to figure out the new layout system comes by way of trial and error. I hope my trial and error stumbling and learning experiences can help you get off to a smoother start.

How FitBit Fascinates

Yesterday I attended a very classy luncheon with a bunch of very classy women. As the meal ended, over pistachio cookies and sorbet, two of the women started talking about their FitBit gadgets.

FitBit One and FitBit Flex.

FitBit One and FitBit Flex. Image from http://www.fitbit.com.

One woman dug her FitBit One out of her bra – yes, she carries it in her bra – and explained all that it did with great enthusiasm. The other woman wore a Flex bracelet. She confessed to being a technology dinosaur, but she was fascinated and obsessed with the data that she got from her FitBit.

They didn’t realize as they talked that they were describing how game theory has affected wearable technology. Nevertheless, that was how FitBit had hooked them both: rewards, feedback, realtime tracking, notifications, nags, acknowledgement. They were both dedicated to making those 10,000 steps per day, to getting quality sleep, to watching their calorie intake. They knew the FitBit was tracking them and they had such easy access to the information, they felt the gadgets had made them healthier people.

If the definition of creating a successful design is making a product that works, then FitBit has taken high tech and game theory and created a great product.

Google recently announced Android Wear, an operating system for smart watches. I wouldn’t be surprised to see FitBit and other technologies like it move into watches soon.

Online seminar: Introduction to ARIA

On March 27 I’ll be leading an online seminar for ADA Online Learning. The topic is Introduction to ARIA.

If you’d like to join the seminar, information about the schedule, registration and more is located at the ADA Online site. It’s free and registration is easy.

The seminar will focus mainly on ARIA landmark roles and will help the people attending see how to use landmark roles in their work. It will include an explanation of how to add landmark roles to WordPress themes that don’t have them built in.

The event is sponsored by the Great Lakes ADA Center.

Good News for Bloggers from Getty Images

Getty Images Embed Tool

Getty Images Embed Tool

Getty Images announced a new embed feature that gives free, legal access to many images to bloggers for noncommercial use.

If you find an image on the Getty site, look for an embed icon(</>) from the search results or image detail page. Click that and you’ll get the HTML code to embed that image on your site.

Getty has images from news, entertainment, sports, archival and creative imagery content. This new embed tool takes the rights of its content contributors and partners into account, because images will include photographer attribution and, when clicked, will link back to gettyimages.com where the image can be licensed for commercial use.

For a look at the dark side of what this means in terms of advertising and to photographers, see Getty did what?